INTERVENTION BY THE DELEGATION OF INDONESIA*) AT AGENDA ITEM 3, THE 28TH SESSION OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL – INTERACTIVE DIALOGUE WITH SPECIAL RAPORTEUR ON CULTURAL RIGHTS AND SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON SALE OF CHILDREN, CHILD PROSTITUTION AND CHILD PORNOGRAPHY

March 11, 2015 Human Rights and Humanitarian Issues

Mr. President,

Indonesia would like to thank both Special Rapporteurs for their comprehensive reports. We also would like to make few remarks.

We welcome the report of the Special Rapporteur on Cultural Rights that examined copyright law and policy from the perspective of the right to science and culture. As a country with vast cultural diversity and abundant genetic resources, protection of local communities’ rights is high on the government’s agenda.

One of the issues raised by the Special Rapporteur on his report is the rights of local communities. She noted that the international intellectual property regimes have historically failed to protect the rights of local communities. This failure has resulted to the vulnerability of the local community to exploitation of their knowledge by multi-national corporations.

Therefore, pending the conclusion of an international legal instrument for the effective protection of traditional knowledge, traditional cultural expression and genetic resources, from the Special Rappporteur’s view, what should the international community do to ensure fair profit sharing between local communities and multi-nationals corporations that profiting from local communities’ knowledge?

Mr. President,

We appreciate the reports of the Special Rapporteur on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.

No country would spill any effort to protect the rights of children. As a state party to the optional protocol to the CRC on the sale of children, Indonesia’s commitment on this issue is unquestionable.

Threats facing children have taken new forms involving information technology. The level of technical capacity and experience of countries in facing these new emerging threats, however, differ from one another.

As mentioned in the report, internet may facilitates sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography. Internet knows no border. It is imperative, therefore, to have a concerted global effort.

In this regard, we wish to seek the Special Rapporteur’s view on the appropriate cooperation framework under which countries with technological capacity, resources and experience can assist countries with limited experience in this area, to combat the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.

I thank you, Mr. President.

Geneva, 11 March 2015

*) Delivered by Mr. Gerry Indradi, Third Secretary of the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Indonesia to the United Nations and other International Organizations in Geneva